What are the benefits of all of our riding areas? When you see us riding in the arena, the fields, under the oak trees and to the pond?They are all sensory riding area and trails that are a rich learning environment of RideAbility. They consist of slopes, turns, varied footing, natural sights and sounds, and man-made "activity stations." This environment challenges the riders balance, stimulates their senses and encourages them to interact with the world around them. Our Activity stations are stopping points that offer riders the opportunity to see, hear, smell, touch and talk about the items they encounter. Our activity stations features road signs, many “obstacles,” and hills and trees. Riders follow directions to stop, start and steer their horses through the courses which may include such actions as traveling over a bridge, circling trees walking or halting at the top of the hill. This provides opportunities for riders to improve their coordination, cognition skills, strength and more. These activity station also mimics many real-life situations such as go, stop, back, safety and what yielding means. In a group we practice taking turns and cooperating. Many of the activity station features a wide variety of sports-inspired activities such as basketball and corn hole while horse backriding. All are designed to help improve balance, eye/hand and bilateral coordination, tactile senses and cognition. The touch station includes balls, lock stations, mazes and foam noodles. It also adds question cards about our horses. We have wooden footbridge, ground poles on an incline, and other activities that offer physical input. As with all activity stations, our sensory area also incorporates colors, counting and other developmental concepts at a level appropriate for each rider. The music station is a favorite for the riders that also helps students improve their coordination, balance, core strength and grasp/release skills. The primary sensory focus is auditory discrimination, which includes conversations about which parts of the xylophone or windchimes are loudest or quietest. We have many hidden toys for riders to discover along the way. Activities along this "can you find it trail" focuses on color/shape identification, visual skills, and verbalization. Our riders love our Quiet Trail ride under the trees or to the pond adding a tranquil, relaxing, calming activity-free time for riders who benefit from a ride through a calm, natural setting. While navigating the trail, students are not only invited to stop and encounter the sensory experiences, they must also concentrate on riding itself: steering the horse, maintaining proper positioning, when riding up an incline and leaning back in the saddle when riding down a hill. These activities address the rider’s balance, and core strength. In combination with the sensory experiences, these challenging equestrian components make riding the sensory trail a comprehensive and super fun. activity.  


THANK YOU MS LUANNE LOVELACE FOR YOUR MANY CREATIVE IDEAS IN THE SENSORY AREA.  

THANK YOU PAUL SCOTT FOR CREATING AMAZING ADDITIONS TO THE SENSORY AREA

Our Riders love it and we are so excited to have this addition to RideAbility.


THANK YOU JUMPS USA HORSE JUMPS FOR DONATING OUR ARENA SUPPLIES


THANK YOU TO LOWE'S OF CLOVER/LAKE WYLIE FOR EXPANDING OUR SENSORY AREA FOR THE HERO'S FOR THE COMMUNITY PROGRAM 






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